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Honda explodes as it orders hundreds of workers at its Ohio plant to REFUND some of their bonuses

Automotive giant Honda has come under fire after it asked workers at one of its US factories to pay back hundreds of dollars in bonuses they received earlier this month, saying it had paid most of the checks by mistake and now needs to get that extra money back.
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Automotive giant Honda has come under fire after it asked workers at one of its U.S. factories to pay back hundreds of dollars in bonuses they received earlier this month, saying it had paid most of the checks by mistake and now needs that extra cash.

The resentment from the carmaker came Tuesday when staff at Honda Motors Co. in Marysville arrived. factory Ohio A memo was sent to the company, which employs thousands of workers, demanding that they return the money for the overpaid bonuses.

The amount of each overpayment is currently unclear as it varies from person to person depending on salary – but bonuses in most cases amount to hundreds of dollars and were distributed to thousands of workers at the Ohio plant.

After announcing in Tuesday’s bulletin that bonuses were erroneously overpaid, Rice at the Japanese automaker wrote that workers will have just nine days to decide how to repay the additional amounts.

Staff will have the option of deducting future paychecks or bonuses or paying the outstanding amount in cash or by check.

The company said on Tuesday that those who avoid these options will have their surplus deducted from them. future bonuses by default.

Workers will have until September 22 to decide how to repay the money – a challenge for many who are accustomed to bonus payments and do not expect to return some of it.

One of a dozen factories in the country that collectively produce over 5 million cars a year, some employees at the factory have since questioned whether the company was justified in collecting the overpayments, while a lawyer said Honda was right to demand mandatory repayments.

Automotive giant Honda has come under fire after it asked workers at one of its US factories to pay back hundreds of dollars in bonuses they received earlier this month, saying it had paid most of the checks by mistake and now needs to get that extra money back.

Automotive giant Honda has come under fire after it asked workers at one of its US factories to pay back hundreds of dollars in bonuses they received earlier this month, saying it had paid most of the checks by mistake and now needs to get that extra money back.

The carmaker's abandonment came Tuesday when staff at Marysville Honda Motors Co. arrived.  A note was sent to the plant in Central Ohio (pictured) requesting they return money from overpaid bonuses.  Thousands of workers are currently working in the factory

The carmaker’s abandonment came Tuesday when staff at Marysville Honda Motors Co. arrived. A note was sent to the plant in Central Ohio (pictured) requesting they return money from overpaid bonuses. Thousands of workers are currently working in the factory

Rice at the popular auto retailer confirmed to DailyMail.com on Sunday that it had overpaid several staff members last week, but did not specify how much those payments were and how many were given.

They added that managers are currently working to address the situation ‘to minimize any potential impact to our employees’.

“Earlier this month, Honda provided bonus payouts to its partners, some of whom were overpaid,” a Honda spokesperson said after being asked about the overpaid bonuses.

“Compensation-related matters are a sensitive issue,” the representative said in an email, adding that “we are rapidly working on this item to minimize any potential impact to our employees.”

The spokesperson added that the company will not provide further information on this issue as it is a ‘personnel issue’.

The wife of an employee who received several hundred dollars in extra bonuses told NBC4 that she owed Honda about 8 percent of the bonus previously awarded.

The woman spoke out for fear that her husband would be scolded for speaking, provided her name was not disclosed.

“Not many people can handle that kind of blow,” the wife of a Honda employee told the station, handing the station a copy of her husband’s note from his employer earlier in the week.

She added that when her husband came home with the bonus check earlier in the month, he asked her if the amount seemed right and said it was, citing more substantial bonuses from the company in the past.

I asked him this. You know, I said, ‘Was that… the highest check you ever had for a bonus check? [Did you think] that seemed strange?’ And he said no, this was not the highest level he had ever achieved.’

However, the note alleged that her husband hesitantly owed back ten percent of the total bonus payment, amounting to hundreds of dollars.

‘It’s, you know, the car payment. That’s half our mortgage,” the worker’s wife told NBC4 in an interview Friday, explaining the difficulty in repaying the amount the family had already taken into account, like many others.

‘That’s two, three weeks’ worth of food. That’s a lot of money for us.’

After announcing in Tuesday's bulletin that bonuses were erroneously overpaid, the Japanese automaker's official wrote that workers have only nine days to decide how to repay the additional amounts.

After announcing in Tuesday’s bulletin that bonuses were erroneously overpaid, the Japanese automaker’s official wrote that workers have only nine days to decide how to repay the additional amounts.

According to a lawyer, Honda is legally entitled to recover overpaid wages, adding that there is no recourse for the hundreds of workers affected and their wages.

“Under the Fair Labor Standards Act, which applies to all employers in the United States, it’s pretty clear that overpaid bonuses or wages can be recovered by the employer,” Sarah Cole, a law professor at Ohio State University, told NBC4.

He advised Cole’s employees affected by surveillance to make the necessary reimbursements and choose the option that best suits them.

“Honda can pursue this in court,” said the lawyer specializing in employment and employment law.

“But of course, it’s going to be very expensive for them to do that, and frankly, it doesn’t look very positive in terms of promotion.”

“So they hope to make a voluntary agreement with employees that the employee willingly repays the overpayment,” he added.

According to Cole, the mistake of overpaying employees goes unpunished, preserving rice at the automaker despite presenting a tough situation for its non-union workers.

The company currently has approximately 30,000 employees in the US alone.

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